TURKEY

Turkish Sephardic Artists Ready to Leave Their Mark in London

35 Turkish Sephardic artists from Istanbul will showcase their artwork in London at ‘1492 Goke Collective Art Exhibition of Turkish Sephardic Artists’. The Exhibition will open its doors to visitors on July 2nd, 2018 at one of London’s most prestigious contemporary art galleries ‘La Galleria Pall Mall’.
Turkish Sephardic  Artists Ready to Leave Their Mark in London

Organized by Yunus Emre Institute in collaboration with Turkish Embassy in London, Turkish Airlines, Turkish Culture and Tourism Office, Cervantes Spanish Culture Institute and Turkish-Ottoman Sephardic Research Center, the Exhibition will be open for visitors until July 7th 2018. London Municipality also supports the Exhibition.

1492 Goke Collective Art Exhibition of Turkish Sephardic Artists will showcase the artworks of 35 artists from various disciplines. The artworks include artisan glass, sculpture, marbling art, mosaics, ceramics, artisan jewellery design, photography, oil-painting, water color painting, acrylic, etc. Habib Gerez, world-renowned painter and poet will be one of the honorary artists. Gerez will participate in the exhibition with his oil paintings and his poem “Art is my Destiny”, a poem he dedicated to the exhibition.  

Other honorary artists include prominent Sephardic artists who have contributed to Sephardic art significantly such as painters Esti Saul and Eti Koen and world-renowned photographer Izzet Keribar. The exhibition will also include sketches of Jewish Attire in the Ottoman Period from Turkish Ottoman Sephardic Research Center’s Managing Director Silvyo Ovadya’s personal archive along with marbling artwork by Beki Almaleh, a prominent marbling artist who had recently passed away.

At the opening ceremony, a mini concert featuring Ladino songs composed with Ottoman melodies and Turkish tunes will take place.

1492 Goke Collective Art Exhibition of Turkish Sephardic Artists curated by Terry Katalan aims to be a cultural bridge between Istanbul and London and highlight the history of Sephardic culture and identity through art.

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